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What Is Drug Addiction?

Drug addiction is a disease that causes long term changes in the brain that's characterized by an uncontrollable urge to seek out and use drugs despite knowledge of all the harmful consequences. These alterations in the brain can cause dangerous behaviour in a person who uses drugs. It's also easy to relapse back into drug addiction. Relapsing is when a person starts to use drugs again after he/she attempted to quit.


Addiction starts when the decision to take drugs is first made. After some time, a man's capacity to pick not to do as such becomes compromised. The desire to search for and make use of drugs will now rely on a very huge urge. This is generally because of the impacts of long haul drug exposure on brain work. The parts of the brain that control reward and motivation, learning and memory, and self control are all significantly affected by addiction.

The workings of the human brain, coupled with human behaviour are altered by addiction.


Is Drug Addiction Treatable?

Yes, yet it's not simple. Since addiction is a chronic ailment, individuals can't just quit utilizing drugs for a couple days and be treated. Most patients need long haul or rehashed care to quit utilizing totally and recoup their lives.


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Dependency treatment must assist the individual to achieve the following

  • Stopping to require using the drug
  • stay drug free
  • be a productive member at work, in society and in the family

Values Of Successful Rehabilitation

According to scientific research conducted since the mid-1970s, the essential principles listed below should be the foundation of all successful treatment programmes

  • Dependence is a complex yet treatable sickness that influences brain capacity and behaviour.
  • There is no particular treatment that is fitting for all.
  • Individuals need fast access to treatment.
  • To be successful, the treatment plan should not focus on the addiction only but the whole person.
  • It's important to remain in treatment long enough.
  • Advising and other behavioural treatments are the most usually used types of treatment.
  • A crucial part of treatment is medication, particularly when combined with behavioural therapy.
  • To make sure the user's most current requirements are met, there is a need for continuous evaluations and adjustments to the treatment regime.
  • Treatment should deal with other potential mental disorders.
  • Therapeutically helped detoxification is just the primary phase of treatment.
  • Patients do not necessarily enrol for treatment by choice.
  • When in treatment, possible drug use must be constantly monitored.
  • Patients in treatment should be tested for a variety of infectious diseases, such as HIV/AIDS, hepatitis B and C, and tuberculosis and also receive education about how to reduce the risk of getting thee illnesses.

How Is Drug Addiction Treated?

There are several steps to effective treatment

  • detox (the process when the body cleanses itself of a substance)
  • behavioural counselling
  • medication for addictions to opioids, tobacco, or alcohol
  • assessment and treatment for co-happening psychological well-being issues, for example, depression and anxiety
  • long haul follow-up to forestall backslide

A scope of care with a custom-made treatment program and follow-up choices can be pivotal for achievement.


Depending on the level of need, mental health services should be added to the medical aspect of any treatment. Family or community based recovery support systems are some of the things involved in a follow-up care.


How Drug Addiction Treatment Incorporates Medications?

Medication can be employed to deal with withdrawal symptoms, treat co-occurring conditions and prevent a relapse.

  • Withdrawal The withdrawal symptoms that are witnessed when detox is done could be alleviated with medications. Detoxification is not in itself "treatment," rather just the initial phase all the while. Patients who only go through detoxification and don't have any additional treatment typically relapse back into drug use. According to a study, 80% of detoxifications used medications (SAMHSA, 2014).
  • Relapse Prevention Patients can utilize medicines to help rebuild normal brain functioning and reduce desires. Various medicines are used for narcotics (pain killers), tobacco (nicotine) and alcohol dependency. Scientists are busy to develop other medications to treat cannabis (marijuana) and stimulant (methamphetamine and cocaine) dependency. Individuals who utilize more than one drug, which is extremely normal, require treatment for the majority of the substances they utilise.

Behavioural Therapies - How Are They Employed To Treat Drug Dependency?

Patients are assisted by behavioural therapies to

  • Change their mindset and conduct towards taking drugs
  • Upturn healthy life abilities
  • carry on with other kinds of treatment, like medication

There are a lot of settings and approaches for patients who are seeking treatment.

Outpatient behavioural treatment comprises a big range of programmes for patients who go to a behavioural health counsellor regularly. Individual and group therapy, or a combination of both are involved in most treatment programs.


Other forms of behavioural therapy available in these program include

  • cognitive-behavioural therapy, that assists a patient to identify, steer clear of, and deal with the circumstances in which he/she is most probable to resort to substances
  • Multidimensional family therapy in which not just the patient but also his/her family is involved able to sort out a lot of things and help the whole family cope with the changes and heal together
  • motivational interviewing, which gets most of the addicts disposed to work on their behaviour and commence treatment
  • Motivational incentives, which uses positive reinforcement to encourage continued abstinence

sometimes, intensive treatments that involve several outpatient sessions every week is given at first. Subsequent to finishing escalated treatment, patients move to customary outpatient treatment, which meets less frequently and for decreased hours every week to help manage their recuperation.


For people with problems of high severity (plus co-occurring disorders), residential or inpatient programs will have better effects. 24-hour planned and organised care system, coupled with proper medical care and safe housing are given in residential treatment facilities that are licensed. Several approaches to therapies that are mainly designed to assist the patients to achieve a life that is free of drugs and crime after treatment are applied by residential treatment facilities.


Benefits of taking an inpatient treatment programme

  • A therapeutic community that is a very structured programme in which a patient stays at a residence, usually for 6 months to a year. The whole community, everyone from the staff to the patients in recovery, act as agents of change, helping to change every patient's attitude, understanding, and behaviour toward drug use.
  • Also available are short blood cleansing programmes offered at the residential facilities to rid the body of drugs and set the foundation for a longer treatment programme.
  • Recovery housing, which is normally an aftermath of inpatient or residential treatment, and where patients are given limited term housing under an expert watch. Recovery housing can assist a person to complete the changeover to an independent life-for example, assisting him/her learn how to tackle finances or look for a job, as well as linking them to the community's support services.

Difficulties Of Re-Passage

Because drug abuse changes the way the brain functions, a lot of things can trigger drug cravings. It is key for patients in treatment, particularly those treated at prison or inpatient facilities, to learn how to identify, steer clear of, and deal with triggers that they are most likely to experience after treatment.