Alcoholics Anonymous Overview support-groups

The Founding Of Alcoholics Anonymous


Many people that were alcoholics were able to get over the condition through the help of the groups such as Alcoholics Anonymous. Alcoholics Anonymous was started in 1935 by Dr. Bob Smith and Bill Wilson who were both recovering addicts as a fellowship with the aim of encouraging other alcoholics on the path to recovery to stay sober. The two came up with what is known as the 12 Steps to guide the meetings which later gave birth to the "12 traditions" that set out the reason for the AA's existence. Many people that have recovered from alcoholism always have something positive to say about the group and the help they were accorded.


There are more than 50,000 AA groups in America alone and over 2 million members in the world.


What To Expect From AA

For first timers, getting the courage to go to an AA meeting may pose a challenge. It requires the individual to venture out of his or her comfort zone and admit before a room full of strangers that they have a problem and need some assistance to get better. Fortunately, every participant within AA is fully aware about how the other feels. The founders of the AA were themselves alcoholics and the groups follow the original model to this day. Everybody in the AA programs even those running them has gone through the program at some point, so they empathize with members.


New members are made to feel comfortable They are encouraged to join the conversations though no one will force them. The meeting participants know from experience that a new member may not find talking about themselves readily at first. In the course of time, most of the attendees realise great healing power of the open honest debating at these meetings.


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Difference Between Closed And Open Meetings

Attendance to a closed AA meeting is just available to recovering alcoholics or to individuals who are looking forward to learning more about how they can overcome their alcoholism.

Open meetings welcome also spouses, friends, and family members of the addicts. The beauty with AA is that they allow you to choose any meeting you wish to attend. For some people, it is preferable to separate their normal lives from their recovery. However, some people recover faster when their families and friends are near them.


12 Stages Of Recovery

These 12 Steps have been the backbone of the AA meetings. It involves following one stage t the next throughout the whole recovery process. The member needs to be comfortable with every step before they can move to the next stage.

One starts with acknowledging they are having a problem and they cannot solve it on their own. Admitting and accepting your mistakes, making an effort to correct these errors and deciding to always try and improve are some of the steps that follow. Learn more about the twelve steps here.


AA Resistance

Some people do not want to attend the gatherings because of excuses. Some of their common objections are the following

  • They don't see if they'll get the assistance they need
  • The guilt of meeting familiar faces
  • They haven't seen their alcoholism as a problem yet

These excuses may seem insurmountable, but the most important thing is to keep your eyes on what you want to achieve.

The bottom line out here is that if you feel there is a problem you are probably right. Attending a meeting can possibly save you from years of heartache caused by your alcoholism it can in no way be harmful.


Looking For An Alcoholics Anonymous Group

No matter where you live, there certainly is an AA group nearby. The meetings held many times so you can catch the next one soon. You should make a decision about whether you want to attend an open or closed meeting and also choose the location you have in mind, and you will definitely find one online through our meeting finder. Contact us on 0800 246 1509 today and we'll help you find an AA group that will suit you best.